Throwing the Trump Card, Update: Evangelical Support?

Donald Trump has no intention of running for president.

Don’t get me wrong.  The Donald may hold a June press conference (his self-appointed decision time), where all the mainstream press will flock to hear the grand announcement that “after much consideration I’ve decided my country- and its economy- needs me.” 

Trump may throw his comb in the GOP primary ring (he’d never cover that famous mane with a hat!), but I believe he has ZERO, ZILCH, NADA intent on winning the nomination or running against Obama in the general election.

Then why would he do it, you ask? 

Well, first of all, the man LOVES the attention!  The recent media fawning has helped ratings for The Apprentice, and likely boosted interest in his other business ventures.  And it’s all about the dollar for The Donald.  Even if he has no serious interest (and my following theory is off-base), the tease has translated into cash for Trump. 

But I believe it’s about even more than money.  Let’s face it, the GOP primary crew is another mostly-anemic blend of has-beens, wanna-bes, and almost good enoughs.  It’s going to take some personality to spark voters’ enthusiasm (ala ’08’s Palin jolt to McCain’s campaign) if any of these fine folks have a chance in Kenya of beating Obama.  What?  What’d I say?  Kenya?

Well, I didn’t say it.  Trump did

“I want him to show his birth certificate. I want him to show his birth certificate,” Trump said on ABC’s “The View.” “There’s something on that birth certificate that he doesn’t like.”    

The Birth Certificate.  The red meat of so-called Obama “conspiracy theorists.”   A topic few serious candidates have dared raise.  Contender and former House Speaker Newt Gingrich has said that Obama ‘absolutely’ was born in the U.S., and former governor of Minnesota Tim Pawlenty was quick to distance himself from Trump’s questioning. 

TPaw told MSNBC’s Morning Joe, “I, for one, do not believe that we should be raising that issue. … I think President Obama was born in the United States.”

So why is Trump bringing this up, especially if he wants to win?   

“Fire in the hole!”   Donald Trump is the bomb-thrower. 

(Can I say bomb-thrower?  Is that acceptable in the “new tone?”  You know I don’t mean literal bombs, right?  Just wanted to make that clear.)

Trump can, and will, and is, saying things about Obama (and the Chinese) that the other candidates won’t.  And, just perhaps, there’s a mild orchestration to The Donald’s “madness,” or as some like to call it, truth. 

Could it be that Romney (or Pawlenty or Gingrich, but most likely Romney) is the silent partner in all this press?  Is is possible that Trump has been recruited to stir up doubts about Obama and the way he’s managing the country, in the blunt way only he can, and in order to keep others out of the mud.  (And if you’re thinking it’s just a waste of his time, Trump has MUCH personal financial interest wrapped up in getting rid of our current anti-business President.)

The strategy would have Trump moving hard and fast in the media against Obama for the next two months and then deciding against the Republican primary, or he could give it a go and pull in MUCH more public interest and media attention to the GOP primary debates and campaign appearances over the next 12 months, all the while taking it on the chin for the more “serious” Romney. 

Trump would be the Dennis Kucinich of the GOP’s 2012 field.  He’d say what no one else could. 

And he’d have no chance in Kenya of winning.

Update:  Could Evangelicals be taking an interest in Trump?   Check out David Brody’s report for CBN News here.

I Gots’ a Peace Prize

The hilarious Steven Crowder strikes again with this play on Obama’s Nobel prize.

Published in: on October 16, 2009 at 2:27 am  Leave a Comment  

“Undercover at a Town Hall”

The side of the story you aren’t seeing, via Hot Air.

“He’s baaack! It’s been too long since our YAF/Hot Air TV special correspondent Jason Mattera’s last video production. But he teamed up with YAF intern and cameraman Adam Tragone to give us a special glimpse into the world of Obamacare supporters at Democrat Rep. Jim Moran’s recent town hall forum in Virginia.

Enjoy it, you “selfish people!:”

Did you make sure to watch it to the very end? Commune Dude is priceless.

“IT owns the clothes.”

Published in: on September 2, 2009 at 2:34 am  Leave a Comment  

A Lesson on Astroturfing…w/ Hidden Camera

The very funny Steven Crowder is at it again, this time revealing how the Left recruits their “volunteers” and “activists.”

From Hot Air’s ALLAHPUNDIT,

How much does a left-wing Astroturfer get paid , anyway?

Answer: There are no left-wing astroturfers, silly. They do it because they love the cause and the “fight” and the Unicorn King currently installed in the White House.

That $33,000 a year plus benefits is just their share of the wealth that belongs to all of us.

Published in: on August 28, 2009 at 2:21 am  Comments (1)  

“Mad High Tax Rates”

From The Foundry blog at Heritage.org,

“On this week’s season premiere of the popular AMC show “Mad Men” viewers were reminded about the punitive high tax rates in the 1960s:

This episode of Mad Men takes place in 1963, when the top income tax rate was 91 percent on incomes over $200,000 ($400,000 for married couples). That translates to about $1.4 million in 2009 dollars. The top rate today is 35 percent on incomes over $372,950. In 1963, by comparison, incomes over $10,000 (about $70,000 in 2009 dollars) paid 38 percent. As the scene from Mad Men makes clear, high tax rates in the 1960s discouraged working harder to get ahead because a large portion of the worker’s additional income went to paying taxes.

Discouraging work lowers economic growth. When this happens we all suffer because lower economic growth means fewer jobs and lower wages across the economy.

Tax rates have fallen significantly from the 1960s. The top rate today is 56 percentage points lower than it was in 1963, so the incentive to work hard and get ahead is a lot bigger now.

But if President Obama’s plan to raise the top two marginal income tax rates to Clinton-era levels and the House’s plan to slap a 5.6 percent surtax on top of that to partially fund a nationalization of the health care system become law, the top average tax rate in the U.S. will climb to 52 percent- higher than in France, Italy, Germany and Spain.

Many workers faced with a marginal tax rate that takes over half of their additional income will decide the extra effort just is not worth it- just like workers in the 1960s did. This will impede economic growth at the worst possible time as the economy suffers through its most severe contraction since World War II.

Mad Men has brought retro-1960s clothing and decor back into style. Let’s not bring back the economically stifling tax policy with it.”

Published in: on August 20, 2009 at 9:25 pm  Leave a Comment  

Cool Summer Reception for Reps.

Great report from Michelle Malkin, author of the new book Culture of Corruption, about the cool homecoming Reps are getting.

Worth reading and watching for inspiration as you attend forums, make office hours, write letters and make phone calls of your own!  Or, my personal favorite, parade protests.  Even in this off-year it’ll be fun.

Democrat Rep. Lloyd Doggett went home to Austin, Texas, and heard from his constituents about the planned government health care takeover.

Message: “Just say no!”

This taxpayer counterinsurgency is exactly what I talked about on the ABC This Week panel earlier today. The long, hot recess is underway. Make yourselves heard. Mark your calendars for the nationwide August 22 Recess Rally. Prepare to be demonized, of course.

And don’t let up until socialized medicine goes down:

In Philadelphia, Kathleen Sebelius and Arlen Specter get an earful (the YouTube user who posted the video calls the protesters “crazies.” You’re going to get a lot of that. Just carry on):

Better video and report from Andrew Monaghan here. Here’s one question from a woman who ticks off failed government program after failed government program and concludes, “How Can You Manage Health Care When You Can’t Manage Cash For Clunkers?”

Published in: on August 3, 2009 at 2:05 am  Comments (1)  

We the People

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Angry constituents speaking out during the Independence Day congressional recess helped put the brakes on Cap and Trade legislation in the Senate.

We can do the same for  Health Care “reform” legislation by taking advantage of town hall meetings, parades, forums, and district office hours with our Representatives during their August break.

Saturday, August 22nd at noon will mark a nationwide “Recess Rally” at every local congressional office in the country.  Visit the Recess Rally website here for more info.

Government-controlled health care is not better for America.

And, as this soldier bravely articulated, completely outside of the realm of congressional powers granted by the Constitution.

And Wisconsin Rep. Paul Ryan (R) on MSNBC,

Tell Me Again, Who’s “Diverse?”

Via HotAir’s ALLAHPUNDIT,

Study: Conservatives more likely to read opposing viewpoints than liberals

Further proof that we’re more open-minded. Or is it?

People with stronger party affiliation, conservative political views, and greater interest in politics proved more likely to click on articles with opposing views, according to the Ohio State study.

“It appears that people with these characteristics are more confident in their views and so they’re more inclined to at least take a quick look at the counterarguments,” Knobloch-Westerwick noted…

The Brigham Young University survey found that journalists also tended to read liberal blogs – perhaps a reflection of journalists’ political beliefs, although even conservatives said liberal blogs were often better-written, Davis pointed out.

Among the political blog readers, a similar trend emerged in which “liberals read almost exclusively liberal blogs, but conservatives tend to read both,” Davis said.

Davis offered another possible explanation for this trend among blog readers. Conservative views dominate talk radio, and so conservatives may feel more satisfied by that outlet and are willing to check out opposing views on blogs.

I prefer the “liberals are more likely to cocoon” explanation, but feel free to vote it out in the comments. Is this bravery, confidence, or media advantage at work? Given that every outlet except talk radio and Fox News is pushing Hopenchange on us, I’m guessing it’s not the last one. Exit question: Are lefty blogs better written? Be honest, notwithstanding the fact that my ego is on the line.

Published in: on June 11, 2009 at 2:34 pm  Leave a Comment  

Common Sense Returning to Midwest?

bees

Saw this and couldn’t really believe it.  Still not sure I do.  Perhaps because I live in a liberal part of Wisconsin.

Still, I do notice a more vocal and determined opposition among my conservative friends.  It’s like a hive of bees who were minding their own business, until someone came along and poked it with a stick.

But are we fighting mad enough?

Via Hot Air,

Conservatism on the Upswing in…Midwest?

My friend Eric Ostermeier at the University of Minnesota has been parsing 160 polls taken recently in Minnesota and the Upper Midwest, and found a surprising resultDespite having elected Barack Obama by wide margins in most of the states, voters in the region have become more conservative over the past two years.  Self-identifying conservatives have reached their highest levels in at least four years (via Mitch Berg):

In 2006, the percentage of Minnesotans identifying as conservatives plunged 5.3 points (15.9 percent) to just 28.1 percent of Gopher State residents. Self-identified conservatives in Iowa also declined by 5.1 points (13.9 percent) to 31.5 percent that year, with the largest drop occurring in Wisconsin, with a 6.1-point decline (16.9 percent) to 29.9 percent. In that November’s election cycle, Republicans lost control of the Minnesota House, the Iowa House, the Wisconsin Senate, as well as three U.S. House seats (MN-01, IA-01, WI-08).

The percentage of residents identifying as conservatives declined again in 2007, by 1.6 points in Minnesota (to 26.5 percent), by 3.0 points in Iowa (to 28.5 percent), and by 2.2 points in Wisconsin (to 27.7 percent).

However, during the last two years, conservatism seems to be mounting a comeback in the Upper Midwest, even though the 2008 election cycle saw Republicans lose control of the Wisconsin Assembly, and lose additional seats in the Minnesota House, Minnesota Senate, Iowa House, and Iowa Senate.

In Minnesota, those Gopher State residents identifying as conservative increased by 1.3 points in 2008 (to 27.8 percent) and by another 1.2 points to 29.0 percent in an aggregation of polling data through the first five months of 2009. This marks the largest percentage of Minnesotans viewing themselves as conservative since 2005.

In Iowa and Wisconsin, the conservative resurgence has been even more pronounced.

Obviously, that didn’t help much in 2008, but part of the answer for that may be in the candidates fielded by the Republicans.  John McCain did not identify with the conservative wing of the party at all until he needed them in 2008, for instance, although McCain has been a fiscal conservative during his Senate career.  The GOP for the most part moved away from conservative principles in order to seem more moderate to voters, and got rewarded with a shellacking.

This could also explain one Congressional victory for MN Republicans.  We heard a great deal about how MN-03 was a transitional district, and that Eric Paulsen was too conservative to win with its voters.  Instead, Paulsen cruised to an easy victory despite his unapologetic embrace of conservative principles, especially on fiscal policy.

Barack Obama’s aggressively statist policies will likely accelerate this reaction, especially if the American economy continues to shrink.  Ostermeier’s data suggests that the way forward for Republicans isn’t to find people who will meekly acquiesce to Obama’s fiscal policies, but to find candidates willing and able to express and defend conservative principles. If every action produces an equal and opposite reaction, Obama’s radical restructuring of the American economy gives conservatives a great opportunity to take seats in Congress at the midterms.

Published in: on May 30, 2009 at 4:45 pm  Leave a Comment  

Good Riddance- and Take Your Friends From Maine with You.

Hopefully Senator Arlen Specter (PA) will enjoy his 15 minutes, because he’s already being overshadowed by the swine flu.

A seasoned political opportunist, Specter saw the writing on the wall that he was likely on his way to a Republican primary loss in next year’s election.

So, is he in Washington to fight for Pennsylvanians?  A political party?  Or, himself?

Of course, this gives Democrats the “magic number” (after the eventual likely seating of MN’s Al Franken), but they’ll still have the same votes on some issues and not on others.

Senator Jim DeMint sums up exactly how I feel about the Specter switch.

“I would rather have 30 Republicans in the Senate who really believe in principles of limited government, free markets, free people, than to have 60 that don’t have a set of beliefs.”

The HotAir Specter timeline is here.

Michelle Malkin has more on the flip-flop here.

Published in: on April 28, 2009 at 8:14 pm  Comments (1)